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Movie Reviews: BRIDGE OF SPIES and STEVE JOBS

Bridge of Spies

My Rating: [usr 3]

Mark Rylance is a name you need to start learning. I have a feeling you’ll be hearing it a lot come awards season. His supporting performance as real life Rudolf Abel, a convicted Russian spy, is absolutely fascinating.

Whilst this stirring story of espionage has a lot of appealingly classic qualities, there’s no questioning Spielberg’s capability to develop aesthetically engaging scenes which address the film’s concepts much much better compared to the story.

The mild Abel’s seizure by unnamed authorities denotes a vague awareness of right and wrong– an complacency rapidly abolished, moments later on, with the initial shot of Tom Hanks’ face.

The picture shrewdly maintains to have it both ways, chastising the sort of oblivious American boosterism of the times whilst satisfying in shoddy intolerant sneers. Spielberg understands where to set a stopping point, nonetheless, keeping a measure of hindsight-enhanced criticism amongst his Hollywood utopia.

So, while this isn’t elite Spielberg, it’s certainly worth a trip to the multiplexes for the high production values and agreeable messages.

jobs

Steve Jobs

My Rating: [usr 3.5]

I’d be very surprised if Steve Jobs doesn’t end up on my top ten list at the end of the year. This is a thrillingly inventive film from the mind of maestro screenwriter Aaron Sorkin, and the equally excellent direction by Danny Boyle.

Steve Jobs is a fast and furiously paced film. It’s structure — Set backstage at three iconic product launches (1984 Macintosh, 1988 NeXT) and ending in 1998 with the unveiling of the iMac — lends itself to such a fast pace. The three main times we see Jobs are in times of high stress, with lots of things going on.

While, Michael Fassbender may not directly physically resemble Jobs, he wholly addresses the vital parts of how we have come to recognize the man. Fassbender totally deserves a Best Actor nomination this Oscar season. The rest of the cast is equally impressive as well — especially Kate Winslet, Seth Rogen, Jeff Daniels, Katherine Waterston, and Michael Stuhlbarg.

While you can accuse Sorkin of making people sound smarter than they really are, or reminding us how important his subjects are, there’s no doubt Steve Jobs has an inventive screenplay, executed wonderfully by Boyle and his actors.

jobs

About Knox Harrington

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Home / Reviews / Movie Reviews / Movie Reviews: BRIDGE OF SPIES and STEVE JOBS

Movie Reviews: BRIDGE OF SPIES and STEVE JOBS

Bridge of Spies

My Rating: [usr 3]

Mark Rylance is a name you need to start learning. I have a feeling you’ll be hearing it a lot come awards season. His supporting performance as real life Rudolf Abel, a convicted Russian spy, is absolutely fascinating.

Whilst this stirring story of espionage has a lot of appealingly classic qualities, there’s no questioning Spielberg’s capability to develop aesthetically engaging scenes which address the film’s concepts much much better compared to the story.

The mild Abel’s seizure by unnamed authorities denotes a vague awareness of right and wrong– an complacency rapidly abolished, moments later on, with the initial shot of Tom Hanks’ face.

The picture shrewdly maintains to have it both ways, chastising the sort of oblivious American boosterism of the times whilst satisfying in shoddy intolerant sneers. Spielberg understands where to set a stopping point, nonetheless, keeping a measure of hindsight-enhanced criticism amongst his Hollywood utopia.

So, while this isn’t elite Spielberg, it’s certainly worth a trip to the multiplexes for the high production values and agreeable messages.

jobs

Steve Jobs

My Rating: [usr 3.5]

I’d be very surprised if Steve Jobs doesn’t end up on my top ten list at the end of the year. This is a thrillingly inventive film from the mind of maestro screenwriter Aaron Sorkin, and the equally excellent direction by Danny Boyle.

Steve Jobs is a fast and furiously paced film. It’s structure — Set backstage at three iconic product launches (1984 Macintosh, 1988 NeXT) and ending in 1998 with the unveiling of the iMac — lends itself to such a fast pace. The three main times we see Jobs are in times of high stress, with lots of things going on.

While, Michael Fassbender may not directly physically resemble Jobs, he wholly addresses the vital parts of how we have come to recognize the man. Fassbender totally deserves a Best Actor nomination this Oscar season. The rest of the cast is equally impressive as well — especially Kate Winslet, Seth Rogen, Jeff Daniels, Katherine Waterston, and Michael Stuhlbarg.

While you can accuse Sorkin of making people sound smarter than they really are, or reminding us how important his subjects are, there’s no doubt Steve Jobs has an inventive screenplay, executed wonderfully by Boyle and his actors.

jobs

About Knox Harrington

Check Also

Comic Con

2016 San Diego Comic Con: Reviewing All the New Movie Trailers

2016 San Diego Comic Con: Rise of the Movie Trailers As we all know by …

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